Actors

14 Great Truths On Anthony Quinn

1. Antonio Rodolfo Quinn Oaxaca , more commonly known as Anthony Quinn, was a Mexican-born American actor, painter and writer.

2. He starred in numerous critically acclaimed and commercially successful films, including La Strada, The Guns of Navarone, Zorba the Greek, Guns for San Sebastian, Lawrence of Arabia, The Message and Lion of the Desert.

3. He won the Academy Award for Best Supporting Actor twice: for Viva Zapata! in 1952 and Lust for Life in 1956.

4. When he was six years old, Quinn attended a Catholic church .

5. Quinn grew up first in El Paso, Texas, and later the Boyle Heights and the Echo Park areas of Los Angeles, California.

6. He attended Hammel Street Elementary School, Belvedere Junior High School, Polytechnic High School and finally Belmont High School in Los Angeles, with future baseball player and General Hospital star John Beradino, but left before graduating.

7. Tucson High School in Arizona, many years later, awarded him an honorary high school diploma.

8. When Quinn mentioned that he was drawn to acting, Wright encouraged him.

9. After a short time performing on the stage, Quinn launched his film career performing character roles in the 1936 films Parole and The Milky Way.

10. He played “ethnic” villains in Paramount films such as Dangerous to Know and Road to Morocco, and played a more sympathetic Crazy Horse in They Died with Their Boots On with Errol Flynn.

11. By 1947, he had appeared in more than fifty films and had played Indians, Mafia dons, Hawaiian chiefs, Filipino freedom-fighters, Chinese guerrillas, and Arab sheiks, but was still not a major star.

12. He returned to the theater, playing Stanley Kowalski in A Streetcar Named Desire on Broadway.

13. He came back to Hollywood in the early 1950s, specializing in tough roles.

14. He was cast in a series of B-adventures such as Mask of the Avenger .

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